Archives for posts with tag: exec compensation
  1. Mercer on global executive pay trends  (via Vincent)
  2. Warren Buffett discloses his 2010 income and tax in this letter (via Dealbreaker)
  3. A multihull yacht designer and some of his clients (via My Modern Met)

Ben Fry at Fathom just released a great interactive visualization of the companies listed in the Fortune 500 from 1955 to 2010. Go spend a minute or two clicking around in the graphic and trying the different views (by rank, revenue, and profit). You’ll notice the following types of companies:

  1. The ones that have been topping the ranks for a long time (e.g., Exxon Mobil, GE)
  2. The ones that have maintained their real revenue and profit levels but declined in rank (e.g., Hormel Foods)
  3. The ones that have fallen from grace (e.g., Citigroup)
  4. The rising stars (e.g., Progressive)
  5. Walmart, the Numero Uno – what happened around 1995 that catapulted the company to the top of the Fortune 500s list from its earlier “obscurity”?

Ben’s goal with this visualization was to “show how 84,000 data points could easily be viewed and navigated in an interactive piece.” Well, I think he’s accomplished that and then some. (HT FlowingData)

  1. An exercise in excess
  2. A case for wage transparency
  3. Economic inequality’s different shapes
  4. A 105-year-old investment banker’s optimism (via The Browser)

A friend shared a very interesting article by an anonymous investment manager who works with very wealthy clients. While the key insights of the article should surprise no one who has worked in prospect research, high level fundraising, or private investment advising, the article is nonetheless worth reading and bookmarking for people in the above professions.

The higher we go up into the top 0.5% the more likely it is that their wealth is in some way tied to the investment industry and borrowed money than from personally selling goods or services or labor as do most in the bottom 99.5%. They are much more likely to have built their net worth from stock options and capital gains in stocks and real estate and private business sales, not from income which is taxed at a much higher rate. These opportunities are largely unavailable to the bottom 99.5%.

(HT Tim)

  1. Google is phasing out its translation API
  2. Executive compensation rises sharply in 2010
  3. China’s wealth gap (via Brendan O’Kane)
  4. Is Silicon Valley in a super robust housing market or a bubble?