Archives for posts with tag: prospecting

Dear reader(s) –

Sorry about the lack of recent updates! I wear several hats (which is literally not a bad idea, living in Chicago), although I shouldn’t make excuses. Here’s hoping I get back on track with the posts.

Some recent reads that I would recommend:

  1. New York Times columnist teaches me a thing or two about prospect research (via PRSPCT-L)
  2. America’s 50 richest zip codes (via Alex)
  3. The Freakonomics guys tackle philanthropy
  4. Very interesting read on the “rise of geezer capitalism in modern Britain” (via The Browser)
  5. This 16-year-old might be quite wealthy some day
  1. Mercer on global executive pay trends  (via Vincent)
  2. Warren Buffett discloses his 2010 income and tax in this letter (via Dealbreaker)
  3. A multihull yacht designer and some of his clients (via My Modern Met)

Why not? TMZ founder Harvey Levin is a fellow UChicago alum, after all. Solidarity, right?

  1. David Ellison (son of Larry Ellison) got married, and this happened
  2. Another son of a billionaire was generous to Zac Efron
  3. John Wayne auction nets over $5 million (via TMZ)

 

  1. Fashion model income data
  2. NBA economics (via the Browser)
  3. Not good (via Marginal Revolution)
  4. Kodak vs. Tumblr

Ben Fry at Fathom just released a great interactive visualization of the companies listed in the Fortune 500 from 1955 to 2010. Go spend a minute or two clicking around in the graphic and trying the different views (by rank, revenue, and profit). You’ll notice the following types of companies:

  1. The ones that have been topping the ranks for a long time (e.g., Exxon Mobil, GE)
  2. The ones that have maintained their real revenue and profit levels but declined in rank (e.g., Hormel Foods)
  3. The ones that have fallen from grace (e.g., Citigroup)
  4. The rising stars (e.g., Progressive)
  5. Walmart, the Numero Uno – what happened around 1995 that catapulted the company to the top of the Fortune 500s list from its earlier “obscurity”?

Ben’s goal with this visualization was to “show how 84,000 data points could easily be viewed and navigated in an interactive piece.” Well, I think he’s accomplished that and then some. (HT FlowingData)

  1. Contemporary Chinese painting sets auction record (HT Tyler Cowen)
  2. The globalization and de-Americanization of business education
  3. Exotic jobs for disillusioned bankers